Saturday, November 23, 2013

08:30-10:00
SARCOPENIA: IMPACT OF NUTRITION ON MUSCLE MASS, STRENGTH AND PERFORFORMANCE IN OLDER ADULTS
Capsule
Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risks for falls which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia – the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age – has recently received increased attention. This session reviews the effect of nutrition on sarcopenia and muscle performance
Chairpersons A.B. Maier, Netherlands
C. Leeuwenburgh, USA
Muscle mass
M. Vandewoude, Belgium
Muscle performance
M. Henriksen, Denmark
Signaling pathway implicated in anabolic resistance: Effects of exercise and nutrition
M. Francaux, Belgium
Evaluation of the effects of nutritional supplements in the elderly population
T. McAlindon, USA
"Under 34" competition winner:
Association between insulin resistance, muscle mass and muscle strength in proximal versus distal bodyparts in healthy young men
T. Gysel, Belgium
Objectives To acquire knowledge of the following:
  • Impact of aging on muscle performance
  • Relationship between nutrition and sarcopenia
  • Nutrition to increase muscle performance

10:30-12:00
LATEST UPDATES AND NEW TREATMENTS IN BMJD
Capsule Bone cartilage and muscle undergo morphological and biochemical changes with aging that lead to degenerative lesions of these tissues. Some physiopathological pathways are common, indicating that some treatments could be effective on all of these tissues. This session is a general overview of the latest innovations in the management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in elderly people in 2013
Chairpersons S. Toegel, Austria
W. Zhang, UK
New therapeutics to manage sarcopenia in the elderly
A.B. Maier, Netherlands
Anabolic treatments and/or uncoupling of bone resorption and bone formation
J.C. Gallagher, USA
Chondroprotection in OA: Results of ERADIAS study
P. Richette, France
New non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to OA
D. Hunter, Australia
Objective Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned about recent advances in the treatment of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and sarcopenia

12:50-14:20
CARTILAGE HOMEOSTASIS AND DEGENERATION
Capsule
Cartilage degradation is a key feature in OA. To better understand the mechanisms leading to an imbalance between catabolism and anabolism remains a challenge for scientists. Recently, researchers paid a particular attention for chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation, angiogenesis or autophagy. These processes are directly linked to cartilage structural changes and could lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets. This session overviews the recent advances in the understanding of cartilage degradation in OA
Chairpersons S. Oesser, Germany
M. Lotz, USA
Cell-matrix interface in cartilage homeostasis
M. Cucchiarini, Germany
Molecular mechanisms in cartilage remodelling and degeneration
T. Pap, Germany
Chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation: Link to matrix angiogenesis and mineralization
H. Kawaguchi, Japan
Objectives Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned how to better understand the recent advance in OA pathophysiology

14:40-16:10
INNOVATIONS IN SURGERY TO REPAIR MUSCULOSKELETAL TISSUE
Supported by an unrestricted grant from Synolyne S.A.
Capsule
Musculoskeletal tissues regeneration is limited and associated with major complications. New approaches have been developed to promote tissue healing including, tissue engineering, cell therapy or growth factors delivery systems or platelet rich plasma injection. Some of these modalities are used in daily practice in sport and regenerative medicine, despite the absence of evidence based guidelines
Chairpersons M. Balligand, Belgium
P. Gillet, Belgium
Cartilage repair
M. Brittberg, Sweden
Subchondral bone repair
H. Madry, Germany
Tendon and muscle repair
M. Brittberg, Sweden
Objectives Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned to have a critical view of the recent advance in connective tissue repair

16:30-18:00
MANAGING BONES IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER AND LIVER DISEASES 
Capsule
Bone metastasis is a common problem with poor specific treatments. However, can symptoms be alleviated to provide a better quality of life?
Chairpersons M. Cohen-Solal, France
P. Selby, UK
Bone metastasis and OP drugs
Osteoporosis prevention after breast cancer
S. Rozenberg, Belgium and C. Antoine, Belgium
Osteoporosis in liver diseases
N. Guanabens, Spain
"Under 34" competition winner:
Protective effect of a new chitosan biomaterial against the development of experimental osteoarthritis lesions in rabbits
F. Oprenyeszk, Belgium
Objectives To acquire knowledge of the following:
  • Bone metastasis
  • Bone pain
  • To understand the potential anti-cancer activities of different osteoporosis therapies

08:30-10:00
BIOMARKERS TO PREDICT OA PROGRESSION
Supported by an unrestricted grant from Artialis
Capsule
Wet biomarkers include gene and protein derived markers such DNA, RNA, protein epitopes or post-translational modified epitope. One important challenge for these biomarkers is the prediction of OA onset and progression. Some of them are able to distinguish radiological progressors and non-progressors. These tools could be used in a personalized approach to OA patients and to select patients for clinical trials
Chairpersons J. Loughlin, UK
J.A. Roman-Blas, Peru
Mitochondrial gene polymorphisms relating to OA
F.J. Blanco, Spain
Protein biomarkers to identify OA progressors
Y. Henrotin, Belgium
Imaging markers to predict OA progression
D. Hunter, Australia
"Under 34" competition winner:
Disability and not osteoarthritis predicts cardiovascular disease. A population-based cohort study
T. Hoeven, Netherlands

Objective Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned to take note of the latest advances in the field of OA biomarkers

10:30-12:00
OSTEOARTHRITIS AND THE FUTURE OF THERAPY: SHOULD WE INVEST IN BASIC RESEARCH OR IN CLINICAL CARE PROGRAMS ?
Capsule Despite the progress in our understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of cartilage and bone, until now the search for disease modifying or chondroprotective drugs has been frustrating. Recent genetic studies have highlighted additional difficulties associated with patient-beneficial progress , for instance the heterogeneity of the disease phenotypes. When taking into account the overall impact of the disease in an aging population, many voices suggest to privelege clinical care over drug development programs. Is this the right choice? This session will foster the debate
Chairpersons R. Lories, Belgium
T. Pap, Germany
Functional genomics
J. Loughlin, UK
Phenotyping in OA: Connecting basic science with clinical practice
J.W.J. Bijlsma, Netherlands
Natural antioxidants to treat inflammatory joint diseases?
H.K. Biesalski, Germany
Objectives Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned:
  • Early diagnosis for better management of OA
  • Treatments adapted to OA pateint phenotypes

12:50-14:20
IS THERE A BETTER TREATMENT THAN PLACEBO FOR OA?
Capsule
In OA clinical trials, 50 to 60% of patients respond to placebo. Further, the effective size of treatments are globally modest. In parallel, drugs like NSAIDs which are largely used in OA are associated with severe adverse effects limiting their use in elderly people. Therefore, before using these drugs the benefit/risk ratio should be considered. An alternative would be the administration of placebo. Is this realistic and ethically acceptable? This session will try to answer at these questions
Chairpersons D. Hunter, Australia
F.J. Blanco, Spain
Debate: Is there a consensus on whether the practitioner should be encouraged to use placebos for OA?
Clinician point of view
P. Dieppe, UK
Methodologist point of view
W. Zhang, UK
Discussion
Can we limit the impact of placebo effect in randomized clinical trials?
M. Marty, France
Objectives Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned:
  • What evidence there is to support different interventions in OA
  • What interventions are effective largely on the basis of placebo effects
  • What are the ethical considerations of encouraging placebos under what conditions should they be encouraged

14:40-16:10
NEW MOLECULES IN DEVELOPMENT
Capsule
Activated immune cells infiltrate the joint in RA and produce cytokines and chemokines. These proteins bind to cells surface receptors, initiating signal transduction cascade through intracellular signaling pathways. These cells cause inflammation and joint destruction. New developments in small molecules can control the task and have been found to have a good profile regarding efficacy and safety
Chairpersons R. Handa, India
O. Gualillo, Spain
Development of JAK inhibitors for RA
T. Hendrikx, Netherlands
When to use them
P. Durez, Belgium
Are they all similar in pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety?
S. Gay, Switzerland
Objectives Upon completion of this session, the audience will have learned: 
  • About new therapeutic molecules 
  • To analyze how the impact the outcome of RA
  • To understand if these new drugs have equally the same or better performance in patients with RA
  • Which are the safety profiles recorded from trials 

16:30-18:00
STRATEGIES IN EARLY RA AND SPONDYLOARTHROPATHIES
Capsule
Different lines of evidence suggest that current biological therapies directed at different molecules or cells have similar efficacy in RA, and target similar populations of patients. Distinct biological effects of targeted therapies may not account for differences in response, but clinical desease activity assessment and targeting remission or low desease activity remain the most important tasks in clinical practice. New strategies being proposed are always interesting to study, especially in early RA
Chairpersons A. Doria, Italy
Recent advances in pathogenic mechanisms in early RA
A.I. Catrina, Sweden
Early RA: Induction, treatment withdrawal and treat-to-target
M. Scarpellini, Italy

Early diagnosis and early treatment: A new challenge in spondyloarthritis?
C. Miceli, France

Objectives Upon completion of the session, the audience will have learned:
  • To assess evidence of benefits in treating and suppressing early RA
  • Identification of possible ways to treat more effectively RA: T2T, " Tigh Control" and new strategies particularly for early RA
  • The relationship between remission criteria and functional activity: How do they impact in clinical practice and trials? 

 

Reduced Registration
Deadline
November 18, 2013
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